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Used by major universities, this is an excellent textbook for teaching introductory courses in fluid mechanics for civil engineering students

Title: A First Course in Fluid Mechanics for Civil Engineers - 2nd Edition NEW
Author: Dr. Donald D. Gray, Ph.D.
Specifications: Hard Cover, 670 pp

Price: US $85
Cat No: FCFM2

ISBN -13: 978-1-887201-8-72

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REVIEWS -- From the TABLE OF CONTENTS

One of the greatest pleasures of fluid mechanics comes from learning how to use mathematics to describe the physical world. Donald D. Gray

 


DESCRIPTION: (Please note: If you are planning to teach an introductory course in fluid mechanics for civil engineering students we invite you to consider this book. To request an examination copy either send a request on your university letterhead to WRP, P.O. Box 630026, Highlands Ranch, Colorado 80163-0026 or fax it to 720-873-0173. Second Edition 2016 WRP.)

A First Course in Fluid Mechanics for Civil Engineers 2nd Edition, this 2nd edition has been extensively revised to incorporate both the years of classroom experience by the author and also to address current approaches to fluid mechanics. This 2nd Edition contains many new examples and more than triple the number of homework problems. It is specifically intended as a textbook for a one semester introduction to fluid mechanics. Some distinctive features make this book ideal for students of civil engineering and related fields such as environmental, ecological, and agricultural engineering:

-> Emphasis on the head concept throughout the text.

-> Emphasis on the importance and limitations of the parallel flow assumption, based on the Euler equation in natural coordinates.

-> Development of the conservation equations using the easily understood balance principle rather than the needlessly abstract Reynolds Transport Theorem.

-> Careful distinction between the ideal Bernouli equation and the mechanical energy equation with loss terms.

-> Use of the total and piezometric head lines for the qualitative analysis of pipe flows.

-> Use of the latest Crane techniques for minor losses in pipe flows.

-> Clarification of when to use gage pressure or absolute pressure in the momentum equation.

 

-> Use of three-dimensional specific head function plots to explain alternate and critical depths in open channels.

-> Explanation of when the Manning equation is valid and when the friction factor method must be used in open channel computations.

-> Use of the easily understood Ipsen method for dimensional analysis.

-> Interpretation of dimensionless numbers as time ratios as well as the traditional force ratios.

-> Interpretation of dimensionless numbers as time ratios as well as the traditional force ratios.

-> Chapter on physical hydraulic models, including distorted models.

-> The book contains many examples worked in detail as well as numerous homework problems, some requiring the use of the computer. A solutions manual is available to instructors.

REVIEWS [top]


"A civil engineering student who reads this textbook in his or her first course in fluid mechanics will indeed find it readabale and exciting." and "This book is also to be recommended for teaching fluid mechanics for civil engineers."

Hector R. Bravo, Review Published in Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, Vol. 127, No. 1, January 2001

"Overall, the book is well written and should be considered for adoption in civil engineering programs." Also,

"The separation of topics into multiple chapters may make it easier to organize the material for classes of different levels." And,

"Overall, Gray's text is a welcome addition to a civil engineering faculty member's bookshelf. Students will appreciate the easy-to-read style with civil engineering applications."

Richard H. McCuen, AWRA Book Reviews, Oct. 20, 00, see:http: //www.awra.org/books/0010awra/book3.html


TABLE OF CONTENTS [top]
Chapter 1 - INTRODUCTION
1.1 - The Scope of Fluid Mechanics
1.2 - Fluid Mechanics in Engineering
1.3 - Units
1.4 - Annotated Bibliography
1.5 - Homework Problems
Chapter 2 - FLUID PROPERTIES
2.1 - The Molecular Basis of Fluid Behavior
2.2 - Properties Related to Mass
2.3 - The Perfect Gas Law
2.4 - Viscosity
2.5 - Homework Problems
2.6 - Bibliography
Chapter 3 - HYDROSTATICS 1
3.1 - Stress
3.2 - Pascal’s Law
3.3 - Variation of Pressure
3.4 - Pressure Variation in a Compressible Gas
3.5 - The Ideal Barometer
3.6 - The Real Barometer: Vapor Pressure and Surface Tension
3.7 - Absolute Pressure and Gage Pressure
3.8 - Piezometers and Piezometric Head
3.9 - Manometers
3.10 - Other Devices for Measuring Pressure
3.11 - Homework Problems
3.12 - References
Chapter 4 - HYDROSTATICS 2
4.1 - Hydrostatic Thrust
4.2 - Hydrostatic Thrust on Plane Areas
4.3 - Examples
4.4 - Hydrostatic Thrust Due to Layered Fluids: The Imaginary Free Surface
4.5 - Homework Problems
Chapter 5 - FUNDAMENTALS OF FLUID DYNAMICS
5.1 - Kinematics of Flow
5.2 - The Euler Equation
5.3 - The Euler Equation in Natural Coordinates
5.4 - Forced and Free Vortices
5.5 - The Bernoulli Equation
5.6 - The Ideal Free Jet
5.7 - The Pitot and Pitot Static Tubes
5.8 - Flowrate and the Streamtube Continuity Equation
5.9 - Differential Head Flowmeters and Cavitation
5.10 - The High Velocity Cutting Jet
5.11 - The Siphon
5.12 - Steady and Unsteady Flow
5.13 - Sharp Crested Weirs
5.14 - The Euler Equation in Rectangular Coordinates
5.15 - Homework problems
5.16 - References
Chapter 6 - THE PRINCIPLE OF BALANCE AND THE CONTINUITY EQUATION
6.1 - Flowrates of Any Quantity
6.2 - The Principle of Balance
6.3 - The Continuity Equation
6.4 - The Reducing Bend
6.5 - The Mixing Tank
6.6 - The Conical Reducer
6.7 - Filling a Tank with Compressed Gas
6.8 - Water Tank Transients
6.9 - The Draining Tank
6.10 - The Continuity Equation at a Point
6.11 - Homework Problems
6.12 - References
Chapter 7 - LAMINAR FLOW
7.1 - Viscosity
7.2 - Couette Flow Viscometry
7.3 - Laminar Pipe Flow 1
7.4 - The Navier - Stokes Equation in Rectangular Coordinates
7.5 - Homework Problems
7.6 - References
  Chapter 8 - THE MECHANICAL ENERGY EQUATION
8.1 - The Energy Balance for a Control Volume
8.2 - The Mechanical Energy Equation
8.3 - The Bernoulli Equation vs. the Mechanical Energy Equation
8.4 - The Piezometric Head Line and the Total Head Line
8.5 - Homework Problems
8.6 - References
Chapter 9 - PIPE FLOW 1
9.1 - The Friction Factor in Laminar Pipe Flow
9.2 - Reynolds’ Experiment
9.3 - Turbulent Flow and the Reynolds Decomposition
9.4 - Homework Problems
9.5 - References
Chapter 10 - DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS
10.1 - Dimensional Homogeneity and the Method of Ipsen
10.2 - The Buckingham Pi Theorem
10.3 - Dimensionless Numbers and Their Physical Meaning
10.4 - Homework Problems
10.5 - References and Bibliography
Chapter 11 - PIPE FLOW 2
11.1 - The Friction Factor in Turbulent Pipe Flow
11.2 - Simple Pipe Problems
11.3 - Minor Losses
11.4 - Pipes in Series
11.5 - Flow of Gases in Pipes
11.6 - Flow in Noncircular Conduits
11.7 - Homework Problems
11.8 - References
Chapter 12 - THE MOMENTUM EQUATION
12.1 - The Momentum Equation
12.2 - Force on a Vane
12.3 - Force on a Reducing Bend
12.4 - Force on a Sluice Gate
12.5 - Starting Flow in a Pipe
12.6 - Homework Problems
12.7 - References
Chapter 13 - OPEN CHANNEL FLOW
13.1 - The Nature of Open Channel Flow
13.2 - Uniform Flow: The Manning Equation
13.3 - Uniform Flow: The Friction Factor Method
13.4 - Specific Head
13.5 - Gradually Varied Flow
13.6 - Gravity Waves in Open Channels
13.7 - Homework Problems
13.8 - References
Chapter 14 - HYDROSTATICS 3
14.1 - Hydrostatic Thrust on Curved Surfaces
14.2 - Buoyancy
14.3 - Stability
14.4 - Homework Problems
14.5 - References
Chapter 15 - PHYSICAL MODELS AND SIMILARITY
15.1 - Scale Model Testing
15.2 - Incomplete Similarity
15.3 - Distorted Models
15.4 - Movable Bed Models
15.5 - Homework Problems
15.6 - References and Bibliography
Appendix A. - - TABLES OF FLUID PROPERTIES
Appendix B. - THE GREEK ALPHABET
Appendix C. - UNCERTAINTY AND SIGNIFICANT DIGITS
Appendix D. - ANSWERS TO SELECTED HOMEWORK PROBLEMS
Subject Index

If you are planning to teach an introductory course in fluid mechanics for civil engineering students we invite you to consider this book. To request an examination copy either send a request on your university letterhead to WRP, P.O. Box 630026, Highlands Ranch, Colorado 80163-0026 or fax it to 720-873-0173. Second Edition 2016 WRP.



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